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Monday, April 6, 2009

DALC LIES ABOUT CAM

Those who are doing the Graduate Diploma in Computing may want to know that whilst the registrar of companies in the UK registered CAM in 2003 and a different company formed in 2006 in its place. DALC has another atrocious claim that CAM was started in 1485. Surely, 518 years is too much of an ever estiation. What was Oborah trying to do here? Well he wanted you to know how well established and legendary CAM is. You can view that prospectus from the DALC website here.

The prospectus says:

The Cambridge Association of Managers was started in the year 1485 to recognize professionals who either achieved from exceptional performance in work-based research or academic qualification from reputable UK colleges / universities.

Individuals would complete studies, work for 5 years or do the reverse and seek this professional recognition, which on certification would prove that beyond academic reading, you are fit to apply acquired skills in the industry.


Clearly DALC is commiting a fraud by trying to mislead on CAMs history hoping that the many centuries will make a connection to CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY. I repeat this is available from the dalc website.

9 comments:

  • DALC 'Expose'- Another Higher Education Scandal

    Kln News

    Parents, guardians and self-sponsored students in Kenya could be losing millions of shillings in fees and other charges in the belief that they would get certificates from two famous UK universities — Cambridge and Oxford —through a correspondent relationship with the Digital Advisory Learning Centre (DALC).

    This is not the first time that a higher education scandal hits the country. Sometime last year it emerged that another institution Irish International University (IIC), which interestingly has connections with DALC was exposed as awarding ‘scam’ degrees to overseas students especially from Africa. One of the IIC directors interviewed on TV actually admitted that there was nothing genuine about the degrees they handed out!

    Here is an extract from the Business Daily Expose; “What’s in a name? Probably everything in the education sector. Schools and colleges with a history, reputation and a string of well known alumni behind them tend to attract more interest from sponsors, parents and students, giving them a huge potential base from which to earn income in the form of fees, grants and endowments.

    The centre, which has eight campuses across the country with a high concentration

    in Nairobi, claims to offer diploma and degree certification from the two universities

    but the reality is different. DALC collaborates with two institutions in the UK — Cambridge Association of Managers and Oxford Association of Management — which run two separate colleges offering management courses but which have no working relationship with either Cambridge or Oxford Universities.

    The colleges are accredited by Quality Assurance Commission Limited owned by a Malaysian businessman and which is not recognised by UK education authorities.



    “There are two accreditation bodies in the UK and QAC is not one of them,” Mr David Higgs, the head of British Council in Kenya told The Business Daily. Accreditation bodies in the UK fall under two categories, public and private.

    Private colleges are admitted through the British Accreditation Council and Accreditation Service of Independent Colleges. Mr Hicks said QAC is registered as a limited company. DALC shares the accreditation body with Irish International University (IIU), which has been locked in a scandal since investigations by the BBC found that it had issued fake degrees and diplomas to more than 5,000 international students in the last seven years.

    To pass off as a partner of Oxford and Cambridge Universities, IIU used to rent facilities for graduation at Oxford or Cambridge universities. DALC, on the other hand, insinuates in their marketing that they get certificates from the renown universities.

    They market their services on the strength of association with the two which, according to the BBC findings is nonexistent. The report concluded that the accreditation body was fake and had over the years presented bogus certificates to unsuspecting international students.

    The BBC findings contrast sharply with claims on DALC’s website. “Assessments and issuance of certificates are done by the upgrading university at their discretion. All Cambridge or Oxford courses are assessed by Cambridge or Oxford and certificates are issued from UK.”

    Then the reputation bit. “The Cambridge and Oxford courses have very good recognition and upgrades to bachelors or masters degrees are guaranteed as long as the student meets the performance criteria alongside other requirements of the accepting university.” DALC has recently put up an elaborate television advertisement campaign where it states that it has an approval certificate

    from the Commission for Higher Education .

    A source at the commission, however, said the institution had only recently applied for a collaboration approval and that the commission was looking at the documents. “We have not issued any certificates to DALC. We are verifying the application,” the source said on condition of anonymity.

    The British Council has also disassociated itself from the institution following complaints related to examinations and failure to confer credits for direct transfers to Oxford and Cambridge. “Questions arose from the kind of activities that the institution was involved in. We cut our ties with them in public interest,” a British Council official said in a telephone interview. He declined to be quoted because he is not authorised to speak to the media.

    DALC head of mission Humphrey Obura, however, said the institution was looking at developing its own curricula after cutting ties with QAC sometime last year. He said the website would be updated to reflect this.

    “We are in the process of initiating a new system where students assessment will be based on our curricula. We have however made it very clear that we are not a university,” he said. The institution is in the process of seeking approval to administer its own programmes. When asked about the relationship with the questionable QAC, Mr Obura said the institution had cut his links with the body and was in the process of

    sourcing for other colleges in other parts of the world to link with.

    A statement from DALC website on the other hand read: ‘You will receive a certificate from Quality Assurance Commission, UK (QAC-UK) confirming

    this accreditation which you can use uniformly in the world for acceptance of the credits hence exemptions from whole level of learning or particular subjects or modules.’ When asked about the relationship between DALC and Oxford or Cambridge universities, the head of the mission said: “We need to meet and talk on issues surrounding accreditation and international university education.”

    A web search for Royal Rhodes Institute (ostensibly based in Canada) — which he said DALC would collaborate with, however, returned no entries. Bogus institutions targeting international students have been on the spotlight in the UK recently.

    “Some of the colleges will say that they have been accredited but when you ask by whom, they name an institution which is in fact owned by them,” a leading academic Professor Geoffrey Aldermann recently testified before the Home Affairs Committee.

    Accreditation experts in the UK estimate there may be as many as 1,000 private colleges operating across the UK targeting international students, which would fail quality standards. Many are found in congested precincts, often sandwiched between shops and office blocks.

    DALC has been operating in the country for close to four years and flags a validation certificate signed by Prof George Saitoti in fliers. It has listed a number of respected professionals in health, finance and other fields as its alumni. When contacted, a few of them declined to comment on the issue.

    A list of all accredited colleges operating in Kenya will be published next month, effectively exposing bogus institutions purporting to be offering degrees on behalf of foreign universities.

    The Commission for Higher Education (CHE), the body charged with the responsibility of overseeing the establishment and accreditation of private universities has raised a red flag over a deluge of complaints from parents and students who had paid millions of shillings to such colleges.

    CHE secretary Prof Everett Standa says the Commission has already finalised a national audit on all institutions and a list submitted to the Government Printer for gazettement. However, he says efforts to identify unregistered institutions have been slowed by capacity constraints. This has seen the Commission revert to a wait and see attitude, relying mostly on complaints from students, parents and the general public.

    “We are working very hard on behalf of students to ensure that all private institutions meet strict quality standards. “Where we are not satisfied that this is the case with a particular college, we will not hesitate to investigate and if necessary, close it down,” said Prof Standa.

    Educationists and employers have questioned the degrees and accused the colleges of churning out half-baked graduates, at a time when unemployment is biting in the country.

    “There are hundreds of institutions which had been licensed to offer certain programmes, but they had ended up rolling out different ones and we have identified them,” Prof Standa told Business Daily

    The end result is expected to be graduates with skills that can help them compete for jobs. The scenario in the local higher education sector is one where demand for vacancies has outstripped supply as indicated by the high number of student exports to Uganda, the US, Malaysia and the UK. This, Prof Standa said, had opened loopholes for rogue institutions offering degrees and diplomas to thrive, dealing a blow to the commission’s reputation. “I would encourage all new students to carefully check the credentials of the college they wish to enrol at and if they have any concerns, contact their local trading standards team.”

    Analysts said mushrooming of bogus colleges was brought about by the past inadequacies of CHE — which had the mandate of approving such institutions.

    The university education crisis continues to deepen every year, culminating into a large number of qualified high school graduates missing out on admission.

    Last year, for example, 63,104 out of 243,453 candidates who sat for KCSE qualified for university admission, but only 10,000 places were available in the six State universities. The remaining 53,000 had to fight for the few places in private universities or pursue their aspirations through parallel degree programmes.

    A government-appointed committee to assess the state of higher education recently warned that the number of students qualifying for university education annually will be more than 230,118 in 2015. According to Prof Standa, CHE has accredited at least 20 foreign institutions to offer degree programmes in collaboration with Kenyan universities and colleges over the last one year.

    Currently, CHE is vested with the responsibility of overseeing the establishment and accreditation of private universities. It also acts as the quality assurance authority for curriculum and degree programmes offered by the institutions.

    Public universities on the other hand, are established by an Act of Parliament with the supervisory role of programmes offered resting with respective university senates.

    In October last year, Education Permanent Secretary Karega Mutahi said out of 544 registered colleges, only 10 offered courses recognized by the Kenya National Examination Council. The rest registered students for courses that were not approved by the council, the only institution with the mandate to vet programmes below university level.” (Daily Nation -Business Daily)

    Now if that’s not food for thought then I don’t know what is!

    < Prev Next >

    April 8, 2009 at 11:09 AM

  • Kenya: College Accreditation Scam Unearthed

    Mwaura Kimani

    9 March 2008

    Nearly 600 colleges are registered to operate in Kenya, but only 10 have been accredited to offer programmes on behalf of foreign universities, higher education regulators have said.

    Recent figures obtained by Business Daily from the Commission for Higher Education (CHE) indicate that only 18 out of 60 colleges, which have applied for accreditation to collaborate with either local or foreign universities over two years, have passed the test.
    <

    This comes as it emerged that parents, guardians and self-sponsored students in Kenya could be losing millions of shillings in fees and other charges in the belief that they would get certificates from colleges purporting to be offering degrees on behalf of foreign universities.

    CHE, the body charged with the responsibility of overseeing the establishment and accreditation of private universities has raised a red flag over a deluge of complaints from parents and students who had paid millions of shillings to such colleges.

    Normally, institutions apply for validation to offer various programmes after which, they are recognised by both employers and the education authorities.CHE Secretary Everett Standa, said a list of all accredited colleges operating in Kenya will be published by the end of this month, effectively exposing all bogus institutions.

    "The danger of getting degree or diploma papers from unregistered institutions is that when a student wants to further their education, they would be barred from most universities," Prof Standa said.

    "Even employers are now approaching the Commission to validate the papers especially those obtained from foreign institutions or those working in collaboration with international universities."

    In October last year, Education Permanent Secretary Karega Mutahi said out of 544 registered colleges, only 10 offered courses recognised by the Kenya National Examination Council.

    The rest registered students for courses that were not approved by the council, the only institution with the mandate to vet programmes below university level.

    However, CHE says the validation process is continuous and there are several institutions whose applications are awaiting consideration.

    Prof Standa says efforts to identify unregistered institutions have been slowed by capacity constraints.This has seen the Commission revert to a wait and see attitude, relying mostly on complaints from students, parents and the general public, to follow up the bogus institutions.

    Educationists and employers have questioned the degrees and accused the colleges of churning out half-baked graduates, at a time when unemployment is biting in the country.

    "There are hundreds of institutions which had been licensed to offer certain programmes, but they had ended up rolling out different ones and we are in the process of identifying them," Prof Standa said. The end result is expected to be graduates with skills that can help them compete for jobs.

    Last week, the Business Daily revealed that thousands of parents could be losing millions of shillings in the belief that their children would get certificates from two famous UK universities - Cambridge and Oxford - through a correspondent relationship with the Digital Advisory Learning Centre (DALC).

    The centre, which has eight campuses across the country with a high concentration in Nairobi, claims to offer diploma and degree certification from the two universities but the reality is different.

    DALC collaborates with two institutions in the UK - Cambridge Association of Managers and Oxford Association of Management - which run two separate colleges offering management courses but which have no working relationship with either Cambridge or Oxford Universities.

    The colleges are accredited by Quality Assurance Commission Limited owned by a Malaysian businessman and which is not recognised by UK education authorities.

    "There are two accreditation bodies in the UK and QAC is not one of them," Mr David Higgs, the head of British Council is said in an earlier interview.

    Accreditation bodies in the UK fall under two categories, public and private.Private colleges are admitted through the British Accreditation Council and Accreditation Service of Independent Colleges. Mr Hicks said QAC is registered as a limited company.But DALC officials refuted the article saying the degrees were valid.

    According to Prof Standa, the Commission is currently studying the validation application by DALC, while admitting that there was a mistake in the DALC case.

    "The authority to collaborate with any learning institution must come from CHE," said Prof Standa.

    The scenario in the local higher education sector is one where demand for vacancies has outstripped supply as indicated by the high number of student exports to Uganda, the US, Malaysia and the UK.

    This, Prof Standa said, had opened loopholes for rogue institutions offering degrees and diplomas to thrive, dealing a blow to the commission's reputation as well as efforts to develop competitive skills among human resources in the country.

    The post secondary education crisis continues to deepen every year, culminating into a large number of qualified high school graduates missing out on university admission.

    Last year, for example, 82,134 candidates who sat for KCSE last year qualified for university admission, but only 16,000 places were available in the seven State universities.

    The remaining 66,000 have to fight for the few places in private universities or pursue their aspirations through parallel degree programmes. A huge chunk is also expected to join tertiary institutions.

    Related story:

    Students seek fee refund as centre is exposed

    By Morris Aron

    Students at the Digital Advisory Centre (DALC) are considering what action to take in view of the unfolding saga over the institution's status and academic programmes.

    The students, who spoke exclusively to the Business Daily, said they were considering demonstrations and lawsuits to pressure for a refund of their money. They also want the Commission for Higher Education to act on bogus colleges operating in the country that have earned millions of shillings from students, parents, and guardians.

    DALC has been operating in the country for the last four years and now boasts over 1,000 students across its seven campuses. It has recently suffered a credibility gap following revelations that its accrediting institution, Quality Assurance Commission Limited UK, QAC-UK, is not recognised by UK authorities.

    DALC offers several programmes of the Oxford Cambridge Association of Managers and Oxford Association of Management which claim a relationship with Cambridge and Oxford universities. However, the associations have no links with the two famed universities.

    Besides DALC is not on the official list -seen by Business Daily - of centres authorised by the Commissioner of Higher Education to offer degrees or diplomas through links with overseas institutions.

    "They applied recently for a collaboration certificate which is under consideration," said CHE's Secretary Prof Everett Standa.

    Asked if an applicant can roll out programmes while the issue was being considered Prof Standa said that would be unprocedural.
    Relevant Links

    * East Africa
    * Education
    * Kenya

    "A mistake must have happened, you cannot offer programmes in collaboration with a university or college, either local or foreign without the proper authority," said Prof Standa

    The confusion, said Prof Standa arose since DALC had been licensed by the Ministry of Education Science and Technology to roll out programmes locally.

    Dr Obora had, in a clarification to the Business Daily, said DALC was offering the foreign programmes on the strength of the validation certificate No MOEST/PC/775/2002 issued by the then Ministry of Education, science and technology in 2002.
    Page 1 of 212

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    April 8, 2009 at 11:19 AM

  • HOW THE EAST AFRICAN STANDARD NEWSPAPER HAS BEEN GENEROUS TO DALC IN PRESS COVERAGE.

    Oborah: Brains Behind Dalc Education
    Date: Thu 30th October 2008
    Mediahouse: East African Standard
    Page: 18

    By David Ohito

    Should his vision become part of the education system, it would be a huge departure from the past. Dr Oborah has proposed radical changes in the education system. It would revolutionalise the traditional system, which seems to put much emphasis on academic performance. Dr Humphrey Oborah has dedicated extensive research in coming up with a suitable education system.

    And for the past five years he has been implementing his findings in a way that radically breaks from the conservative system. As the head of missions at the Digital Advisory and Learning Centre (Dalc), Oborah has embraced modern education practices. Here, all students are assessed for ‘Gifts and Talents' before admission.

    In the conventional system, students are lumped together into a common system where they compete equally in all disciplines. Predicting pupils' abilities at a tender age and admitting them into school to maximise those talents is the key in Oborah's system. He says many children under-achieve or become stressed academically due to a mismatch between their abilities and what they are forced to study.

    "This is often because teachers or parents have not known their real ability," he says. Students at a past graduation. Photo: File/Standard He adds: "Most teachers and parents resort to traditional extra class tuitions to make the students cram and memorise facts to pass national examinations."

    In colleges and universities, candidates wait until a few days before writing examinations, then get leave from their places of work to cram their notes. "They can hardly remember anything three months later when a potential job finally beckons," he told The Standard.

    But under the Dalc system, referred to as ‘Gift and Talent Testing or Assessment for Prior Learning', things are done differently. "Someone's real career is determined at the onset before admission. This is done using computer technology assessment," he explains. The test, he says, goes deep into finding out aspects like, ‘who is this learner?', ‘what can he/she learn and what won't he/she learn?'
    Accurate

    "If well applied the tests can give accurate indicators to what an individual can or cannot achieve within the education or academic context," Oborah says. "Refined abilities in one area could indicate the learner is talented in a specified field, hence a high likelihood of the individual excelling in a given academic field. Alternatively, the absence of such ‘refined' abilities can be made up for with strengths (gifts and talents) in other areas," he adds.

    Oborah says the main aim of the tests is to gather ‘symptoms' (indicators of potential exhibited by a learner) for use by a career expert in giving a ‘prescription'. This gives direction for placement in a learning environment with suitable aids and tools for the learner.

    His current research is on Biomedically Approached Education, which proposes all learners be assessed professionally and an ‘Academic Prescription' defined before any learning. Oborah criticises admission processes based on entrance examinations and grades, arguing they ought to be eliminated.
    Admission board

    "In Kenya, for example, the research suggests elimination of the Joint Admission Board (which admits student to public universities). Its procedures fail to cater for ‘Academic Incidents' that would make a very intelligent candidate fail national examinations," he says.

    He asks: "What if a candidate was sick a month to examinations or was in and out of class due to lack of schools fees? If the grade in the examinations results is, say a D+, is it a true reflection of the candidate's potential?"
    No schools

    But his most radical prediction is that schools will be no more in the future.

    He links the current wave of home-schooling to the exit of age-old traditional school. In its place, he says, that towards the end of the 21st Century, no one will be required to go to school. "There will be academic clinics to dispense the academic prescriptions," he predicts.

    Oborah is also involved in several activities, nationally and internationally, to promote the concept, which he says would save governments and parents a lot of money in school resources while maximising on quality. Dr Oborah was born in a village near Lake Victoria to peasant parents who could only manage a meal a day. His father had to go fishing in Lake Victoria while his mother, younger siblings and himself tended to their small farm.

    On completing his primary education, Oborah attended Matinyani Secondary School in Kitui District. He proceeded to Dagoretti High School before joining the University of Nairobi to study medicine. He later changed his course to study mathematics and computer science.

    April 8, 2009 at 11:24 AM

  • Kenya
    Institution Misleading Students into Believing they are Working Towards Oxbridge Degrees

    Thousands of students are reportedly enrolling at an eight-campus institution in Kenya under the misguided belief that they will be working towards degrees from possibly the two most famous universities in the world – Cambridge and Oxford. The Digital Advisory Learning Centre (DALC) claims to offer diploma and degree certification from the two universities but the reality is that the institution is in fact collaborating with the Cambridge Association of Managers and Oxford Association of Management, which run separate colleges offering management courses but which have no working relationship with either Cambridge or Oxford Universities.

    The two colleges are accredited by Quality Assurance Commission Limited, owned by a Malaysian businessman and not recognized by UK education authorities, reports Business Daily.

    The Kenyan newspaper also reports that there are approximately 600 colleges registered to operate in Kenya, with only 10 accredited to offer programs in collaboration with foreign universities. And of the 60 colleges that have applied for such accreditation from the Commission for Higher Education, only 18 have passed preliminary benchmarks in the last two years.

    DALC has been operating in Kenya for four years and enrolls approximately 1,000 students. In addition to working with outfits in the UK with questionable accreditation and recognition status, DALC itself is not on an official CHE list of colleges authorized to offer degrees or diplomas in collaboration with foreign institutions, although it does have the authority to offer its own programs. Questions surrounding DALC surfaced two years ago after the British Council omitted it from the roll of colleges it recommends to students wishing to transfer or earn credits at UK institutions. A list of all accredited colleges operating in Kenya reportedly will be published in April.

    - Business Daily
    March 9, 2008

    April 8, 2009 at 11:33 AM

  • Oborah: President of the Department of the WIDU-DALC Education, and a Vice-President of the WIDU.

    WIDU World Information Distributed University
    OUTSTANDING RESEARCHERS & PROFESSORS

    In accordance with the generally adopted criteria to qualify for outstanding researchers and professors, a person need satisfy the following criteria:
    1. Documentary proof of person's receipt of major prizes or award for outstanding achievement in the academic field;
    2. Documentation of the person's membership in associations in the academic field which require outstanding achievements of their members;
    3. Evidence of the person's original scientific or scholarly research contributions to the academic field;
    4. Evidence of the person's authorship of scholarly books or articles (in journals with international circulation) in the academic field;
    5. Availability of the person's Diploma of Grand PhD and Certificate of Full Professor.


    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


    Dr. Humphrey P. OBORAH

    Dr. Humphrey P. OBORAH

    Dr. Humphrey P.O Oborah, the Head of Missions and Curriculum Manager of DALC EDUCATION EAST AND CENTRAL AFRICAN REGION is awarded the scientific degree of International Doctor of Philosophy and the Title of Full Professor from the European Academy of Informatization and the World Information Distributed University in June, 2008.
    A Profile of Dr. Humphrey Oborah: Success is merely the process of fulfilling your own hopes and dreams - not the standards set by society, but by the standards set by you, so to succeed, you need to set your goals high, and do not stop till you get there.
    Dr. Humphrey Oborah was born along the shores of Lake Victoria to peasant African farmers who could only manage one meal per day. His father had to go fishing in Lake Victoria while himself, the mother and smaller siblings would tend to the farms.
    He started school early than the normal age at the time but did extremely well in Primary School, which was a school made of iron sheet roof and earthed walls.
    His great performance in national examinations at primary school level saw him admitted to a far location away in another Kenyan Province (Kitui, Eastern Kenya Province from where he again excelled and joined A Level Studies in Nairobi Province and later to join University of Nairobi for Bachelor of Medicine degree course.
    He later on changed his course to study Mathematics, Computer Science and Meteorology. The study of Meteorology and constant teaching in schools earned him great interest in educational forecasting. So when he earned the DAAD (German Scholarship) for Masters Degree, he studied both Computing (Information Systems) and Curriculum Development.
    His excellent achievement at Masters Degree earned him a scholarship for PhD at St. John's Curriculum College (Cambridge) where researched on Electronic Curriculum (e-curriculum) with a bias to Gift and Talent Testing (GnT). He researched extensively on Early Childhood Education especially pedagogy and cognitive skills bridge with e-curriculum and GnT. This culminated in the production of real time multimedia educational products at Old Trafford.
    He worked the World Talent and Career Testing in UK before thinking of getting back home to start The Digital Advisory & Learning Centre, or simply DALC Education, as it is now fondly referred to by its publics.
    He has published a number of fast/paced and 21st century educational research articles covering Embedment of Gift and Talent Testing in School/College Admission Process; Career Forecasting and Management; Bio medical Education;Electronic Curriculum; Expertise in Education; Practical Learning with ongoing practical Examinations Dr. Oborah is a refined educationist who always appears on major Kenyan TV channels to talk and advise on the best educational practices.
    He is a member of a number of local and international organizations. Among them are: Vice President - World Council for Gifted and Talented in Africa; S ecretary General - Computer Society of Kenya.
    Dr. Oborah has been very instrumental in initiating a number of social responsibility functions. In this regard, he has, through DALC Education, assisted the many Orphaned Children Homes and Schools for the poor in Kenya: Mama Fatuma Homes; Thomas Barnado homes; Huruma Children Home; Starehe Girls Centre; Mukuru Kayaba Primary School; Eldoret Chidren Rescue Centre; Mwima Chidren Centre Mombasa
    He is now establishing 3 children homes to cater for those born with HIV or dumped in dustbins by poor mothers. He has also started a home for aged.
    He thrives in vision and foresight. He acts by design and seldom by default. He believes in originality, creativity and innovation of ideas. To him, the world can only be a better place if and only when the society allows creative minds a chance to exploit their special gifts. When he set up DALC Education in January 2003, many took him for granted.About DALC, they said ?yet another downtown college' and they watched to see the institution shut down due to low or lack of admissions, stiff competition, finances, and a myriad of similar problems associated with setting up an education institution in the third world. But all in vain.
    The Head of Missions of DALC Education still holds on to the memories of the humble beginnings ."so we had only three students for six months for whom I had to pay examination fees to prove that I meant seriousness."
    But success has a way of following winners to the beautiful gates of heaven. Once you set your goals right and focus on achieving them, you always get rewarded for your hard work and determination.
    "Once the pioneers did the examinations and certificates came on Cambridge letterhead, we had long queues of people wanting to register for the Cambridge programs," Dr. Oborah recollects with a tinge of contentment in his tone. This success must have been the best news to the residents of East and Central Africa since DALC Education had earlier in July 2002 had been licenced to offer the high impact programs of University of Cambridge International Examinations.
    Growing up in the curtain years of the last millennium, and even more so in the African continent, the reality of education, particularly the lack of it is a hardship one has to grapple with. As they say in the business world, nothing but death and taxes is certain these days.
    And with the cosmopolitan society we were raised in, any kind of mobility - be it financial, social or even geographical movement proves to be a tall order. Right from the onset, parents identified and still look at quality education as the sure key and path to the very elusive happiness.
    Necessity they say gives birth to innovation. Wish and the creative mind will make it happen. Seek and innovation will bring it to your doorstop.
    Other than DALC education, Dr. Oborah recently launched the Centre for Academic Referrals, Testing and Management (CARETM). His idea here was to enable parents foretell their children's career early in life hence avoid making serious and costly career blunders later in life.
    Dr. Humphrey P.O Oborah is decorated by the Order and the Honorable Title of CAVALIER of World Order of Science, Education, Culture. He has been appointed as a Director of Global Education System and as a President of the Department of the WIDU-DALC Education, and a Vice-President of the WIDU.

    April 8, 2009 at 11:41 AM

  • hahey. It gets much much better.

    April 8, 2009 at 5:34 PM

  • What is foolishness?

    1. Enrolling for a course that is not accredited?
    2. Not making any effort to prove the accreditation
    3. Paying hundreds of thousands to an institution that has UK connections?
    4. Not making any effort to prove if the institutions are valid?
    5. Giving your money to DALC which does not issue receipts
    6. Submitting your examinations to the DALC system
    7. Listening to an explanation from a pathological liar?
    8. Defending the same man who is exploting you..
    9. Not caring if his degree is fake...because he printed your diploma
    10. Graduating from the same institution

    April 8, 2009 at 5:55 PM

  • UPDATE

    In UK there are many colleges that sponsor Irish international university qualification. When you apply for a visa if the college is on the UK verified and recognized list you get issued with a student visa. The admission and college fees are the same as any other university degree course. Upto now the Irish international university is succesfully scamming students.
    The UK educational standard regulators request that the students contact the local trading standard office if they'd been scammed, as the costs are recovered from the colleges and not directly from the so called university it self.
    But little they know that the corrupted case workers prefer to take the bribe offered by the colleges and never investigate the case knowing fully well that many students are on a tight budget and cannot afford a reputable lawyer to fight for their own case. I say this as I've seen this happen to people I know and after 3 years since informing the trading standard office the students haven't been informed of any update regarding the case, but just that it's still under investigation. If the authorities that are meant to prosecute these criminals are in for there own gain, I think irish international university and many others will keep scamming students and nothing will be done about it.

    July 27, 2010 at 2:59 PM

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